Pro Life in TN

My photo
Pro Life thoughts in a pro choice world through the eyes of a convert. I took early retirement after working in the social work and Human Resources fields but remain active by being involved in pro life education, lobbying and speaking .



Friday, May 25, 2012

(Prolifer)ations 5-25-12

from Jill

Thumbnail image for blog buzz.jpgby Susie Allen, host of the blog, Pro-Life in TN, and Kelli
We welcome your suggestions for additions to our Top Blogs (see tab on right side of home page)! Email
  • ProWomanProLife links to the testimony of a blogger who has finally found her voice regarding her past abortions, which she confesses caused a great deal of emotional trauma as well as incompetent cervix, resulting in the loss of her third child.
  • Pro-Life Action League’s Ann Scheidler hits the nail on the head in her post noting the strange compartmentalization of the left’s latest campaign tactic, “Dreams of our Daughters”:
    Why would we want to teach our daughters that it makes good sense to use discipline in choosing what to eat, getting enough exercise, doing homework, striving to be the best, but when it comes to sexual activity, the message is “Take a pill and do whatever you want”?
    Would anyone think it made sense if we invented a pill that would counteract all the calories in ice cream and candy bars, and then told women, “Take this pill and eat all you want”? Why is discipline and moderation in the area of eating hailed as an ideal — note Michelle Obama’s campaign against childhood obesity — yet discipline in sexual practice is dismissed as impossible?
  • At The New Feminism, Jennifer Lahl discusses the importance of protecting female fertility by educating ourselves.
  • Pro-Life Wisconsin rejoices – while NARAL laments – that Affiliated Medical Services has joined Planned Parenthood in discontinuing its RU-486 chemical abortions. Legislation banning webcam abortion, which the industry saw as their cash cow of the future, may be the reason for the announcement. PLW notes:
    The average woman loses four times the amount of blood in a drug-induced medical abortion as compared to a standard surgical abortion. Several deaths have been attributed to mifepristone and therefore its prescription and use – from a medical standpoint – ought to be highly restricted, if not banned.
    But these risks are ignored by an industry whose profits depend on volume.

  • The Passionate Pro-Lifer describes the recent States of Refuge protest in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. (States of Refuge travels to states with only one remaining abortion clinic in each – Arkansas, Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.) Apparently, the “Civility, Compassion, and Love” counter-movement wasn’t quite as civil and loving as it could have been:
    My biggest regret is that I didn’t capture the “civility” of a senior citizen in front of the St. John’s
    Episcopal Church
    on film. On the way to the front entrance OSA participant, Ken Scott, put Sing a Little Louder fliers on the wind shields of several cars parked on the street. An enraged recipient, who by the way, had what appeared to be his grand daughter with him, was so incensed that were police not in the immediate vicinity I feel certain he would have gone to blows with Ken.
  • Moral Outcry discusses the news story of a British man who was arrested for smuggling six roasted human fetuses (warning – graphic photo) – wrapped in goldleaf – in his luggage. He had purchased the fetuses online for $6500 and planned to sell them for use in Taiwanese black magic rituals. This sort of idea shocks our sensibilities, but is our culture really all that different?
    Fetuses found wrapped in gold leaf are used as “good luck” charms, which may be one of the ultimate in witchcraft….
    The Taipei Times reports that the use of dead babies in black magic rituals is rather common, adding that most are stillborn babies from abortions….
    We think all the witchcraft and black magic is happening in Korean energy capsules or creepy fetal good luck charms but it’s really far away and “we” don’t do that. Really, we use an aborted baby in a lab to create taste receptors; we slap the processed ingredients on our faces to preserve our beauty and look younger.
  • Wesley J. Smith uses the example of the embryonic stem cell research debate as a way to point out that good science and good ethics should go hand in hand:
    I believe that in part due to President Bush’s keeping the focus on the value of human embryonic life, scientists looked for ways to get the hoped for benefits of embryonic stem cells, without destroying or cloning embryos. This led to the induced pluripotent stem cell breakthrough that takes normal cells, changes them to stem cells, and thence into other types of tissue.

No comments: